Parol

Parol: A symbol of Filipino Christmas Spirit

Filipino Christmas celebration is colorful, lively, full of traditions, bright and definitely twinkling. One of the most iconic symbol of  Filipino Christmas spirit is the Christmas lantern or locally known as “paról”. The star-shaped lanterns are displayed hanging outside the house, along the busy streets of the cities and even in provincial towns and small villages. May it be a parol with simple or intricate designs, for Filipinos it is an expression of shared faith and hope. It also symbolizes the triumph of light over darkness and Filipinos’ goodwill during Christmas season.

For Filipinos, parol making and hanging them outside is a representation of the star of Bethlehem that guided the Three Wise Men to the manger of the newly born Jesus Christ. The origin of paról can be traced back during the Spanish era in the Philippines, when the Spaniards brought Christianity to the islands. Parols were initially used to light the way to church to faithfully attend the 9-day Simbang Gabi or Misas de Aguinaldo, which begin on the 16th of December, a devotion for petition of special favors. After coming home from hearing the mass, instead of putting away the lantern somewhere else, people would hang it outside the house.

Parol Christmas lantern
Parol
Photo by Ike Jamilla
http://emjamilla.googlepages.com

Paróls are star-shaped lanterns and traditionally made of  bamboo, papél de japón (Japanese paper) and illuminated with candle or kalburo (carbide). As times goes by, the lantern evolved into more intricate, lavish and brightly lit Christmas ornament. Aside from the traditional design of parols, other materials are used such as capiz shells with elaborated lights became very popular as well. Adding to the meaning of parol, the lantern also demonstrates the craftsmanship of Filipinos. Many communities, such as villages, schools, and groups hold competitions to see who can make the best paról. In the province of Pampanga, an annual Giant Lantern Festival is held, which attracts various craftsmen from across the archipelago.

Yuletide season is definitely bright and twinkling in the Philippines, no wonder with the paról, it became the Festival of Lights. To appreciate and see the peak of the Festival of Lights in the Philippines, one must travel at night from December 16th up to January 6th. All kinds of paróls will make your holidays merrier and bright. Filipinos’ Christmas lantern, a tradition, an art and an iconic symbol of Christmas.

Photo disclaimer: The Mixed Culture does not own the photo(s) used in this post, however, proper permission to use the photo(s) above was given to The Mixed Culture. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of any photo(s) without express and written permission from the artist and/or owner is strictly prohibited. For any photo related interest, please contact the artist directly, by visiting the webpage provided or leave us a message.

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7 thoughts on “Parol: A symbol of Filipino Christmas Spirit

    1. hello!thank you for letting us know. so exciting! sure go ahead! 🙂 and feel free to tag us anywhere 🙂 I also have a FB page if you want to tag it as well…so TAG it away!!! Good luck and if there’s anything you see in my site that is useful for you, feel free to use them all 🙂

      Much appreciation,
      Imelda

  1. the article is so timely specially Christmas is approaching…
    thank you for the info.. it catches my attention to read it till the end.. may i ask permission to read some lines of your article to relay to others on why we have parol during Christmas. thank you.

    1. Hi Angelo,

      Thank you for reading it. Sure go ahead and share it. That’s the reason why I wrote it, to let others know the meaning of parol as many forget or dont’t it especially the new generation.

      Warmest regards,
      Imelda

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